beef brisket stew

we love making dishes that require very little attention… things that you can throw together in a pot and walk away for an hour or so. and when you come back, it’s ready to be devoured.

we noticed our local beef guy was selling some freshly butchered beef brisket today… the blood was still dripping from the hanging rack. after picking up about a pound of meat, we wanted to throw in some tasty aromatics. that’s when we stumbled upon this one stall that had fennel for sale. we bought a whole head, along with a medium daikon, for only $5 hkd… what a freakin deal. it pays to visit the same vendors and get chummy with them.

the flavors in this stew are simple and light. it’s mildly sweet from the root veggies, but mainly we wanted to highlight the flavor of the beef. we used a pressure cooker to greatly reduce cooking time.

beef brisket 1 lb (0.45 kg)
daikon 1 medium
fennel 1 medium
onion 1 medium
carrot 1 medium
garlic 3 cloves
bay leaf 2
star anise 2
cinnamon 1 tsp
soy sauce 1 tbsp
salt 1 tbsp

  • in a pot, add oil and toss in the beef to lightly brown, add the salt
  • rough chop all the vegetables and throw them into the pot once the beef is evenly browned
  • pour enough water to barely submerge the beef and veggies
  • add the remaining items to the pot; bay leaf, star anise, cinnamon, and soy sauce
  • cover with a lid and bring to a boil
  • once boiling, turn heat on low and simmer until beef is tender, about 2-2.5 hrs (about 50 min in a pressure cooker)
  • salt and pepper to taste
beautifully butchered beef

beautifully butchered beef

simple flavors highlighting the fresh ingredients

simple flavors highlighting the fresh ingredients

commentaries

jun:

to make a rich broth, add some miso paste and a couple of shiitake mushrooms! you may have to reduce the amount of salt if you’re adding miso.

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4 responses to “beef brisket stew

  1. Interesting addition with the fennel, as it’s not a common Chinese ingredient? My wife never heard of it before I introduced it to her (in grilled form). But it makes a lot of sense as the star anise has similar flavors.

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